Author Archive: Caitlin Kennedy

Caitlin Kennedy

Caitlin Kennedy is a Manager in BIO’s Communications Department. She is a long-time native of the Washington, D.C. area and has worked at BIO since 2009.

Caitlin graduated the University of Delaware, where she studied Political Science, Criminal Justice, and Veterinary Medicine. Caitlin has worked at such organizations as The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of Communications and Quinn, Gillespie & Associates, Public Affairs.

What Caitlin likes best about BIO is working to bring awareness to the most recent and innovative therapies that can help save the lives of patients while bringing down the costs of health care.

She spends her free time working out to Shaun T’s Fitness DVDs, enjoying Jonah Hill’s authoritative guidance in the epicurean delights, and going on adventures with her dogs Murphy and Seamus.

Latest Posts

5 Arguments from the GMO Debate That Have Lost Their Gusto

GMO Debate

The Washington Post recently published a piece titled The GMO Debate: 5 Things to Stop Arguing, which looks at common arguments surrounding the use of genetically modified organism (GMOs) and how they have lost their vigor.  Specifically in her article, Tamar Haspel suggests 5 somethings taken from both sides of the debate that need to be retired. Haspel argues that moving beyond these 5 points could mean moving one step forward in achieving a happy medium between the two parties. 1. GMOs are Read More >

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Enjoy Your Halloween Candy Without the Guilt

Guilt-free

More than 90 percent of the sugarbeets grown in this country are GMO. And genetically modified sugar beets make up half of the U.S. sugar production.  So if you’re eating foods containing sugar, chances are, those foods are GMO. But it is interesting to note that sugar made from GMO sugarbeets is indistinguishable from other sugar because the GMO protein in the beets is removed in processing. GMO sugar beets are genetically engineered to tolerant Read More >

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Wheat Scientists at Borlaug Dialogues Call for More Research on the Crop

wheat

Dr. Norman Borlaug was an American biologist, humanitarian and Nobel laureate who has been called “the father of the Green Revolution,” “agriculture’s greatest spokesperson”and “The Man Who Saved A Billion Lives”. He is known for his work on solving a series of wheat production problems that were limiting wheat cultivation in Mexico. The work in Mexico not only had a profound impact on agricultural production in Mexico but in many parts of the world as well. In 1970 Norman E. Borlaug Read More >

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BIO Member Company Achieves Significant Milestone in Advanced Biofuel Technology

abengoa-fermentation-tank-115x76

On Friday, October 17, 2014, Abengoa Bioenergy opened its 25-million gallon per year cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Hugoton, Kansas.  Abengoa completed the construction of its facility in mid-August and began producing cellulosic ethanol at the end of September. The plant produces up to 25 million gallons a year using only raw biomass “second generation” for the production of ethanol, ie residues of agricultural crops and inedible stems and leaves that do not compete with grain for feed materials. Through Read More >

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BIO Members Receive 2014 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award

gcc

Today, BIO announced that two of its member companies, Amyris and Solazyme, Inc., have received awards in the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge for industrial biotechnology applications that produce farnesene and algae oils. Green Chemistry or sustainable chemistry aims to design and produce cost-competitive chemical products and processes that reduce pollution at the source.  Specifically, it minimizes or eliminates the hazards of chemical feedstocks, reagents, solvents, and products.   The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes that industrial Read More >

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