Author Archive: Jim Greenwood

Jim Greenwood

Jim joined BIO as President & CEO in 2005 after representing the eighth district of Pennsylvania in the U.S. House of Representatives for six terms.  He had worked with BIO while in Congress on stem cell research and other health issues, and has since learned so much about the many applications of the science in food and agriculture and in industrial and environmental biotechnology.

Due to its revolutionary research and development in issues ranging from feeding the world by increasing crop yields to healing the world with new medicines to providing cleaner sources of energy, Jim is a passionate champion for biotechnology. When visiting member companies, he is inspired by executives and scientists who are united in their mission to help patients, farmers and other consumers lead a better life.

Prior to Congress, Jim served in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and Pennsylvania Senate for six years each.  He and his wife Tina live in historic Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania (where he has participated in the re-enactment of George Washington crossing the Delaware River on Christmas Day in 1776). He enjoys fishing, birding and scuba diving.

You can find him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/jamescgreenwood.

Latest Posts

Misguided Fear of Biotech Should Not Translate to Regulatory Hurdles

A recent editorial in the New York Times lays bare how demonization of biotechnology hinders innovations that can “save lives and protect the environment.” Opponents of genetic engineering stoke consumer distrust of biotechnology, against all evidence of the industry’s safety record, only to drive up regulatory costs for biotech companies, argue the authors, Pamela C. Ronald, a professor of plant pathology at the University of California, Davis, and co-author of Tomorrow’s Table, and James E. Read More >

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Maintaining a Healthy Biotech Industry

For emerging biotech companies, the economic climate remains challenging. As of April 2010, 38 percent of public biotech companies were operating with less than a year of cash and 24 percent were operating with six months or less of cash, much higher than historic averages. Investors remain wary of taking risks, particularly given the current volatility in global financial markets, and biotech investments are a risky proposition. A biotech discovery runs a one in 5,000 Read More >

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BIO Media Briefing Provides Update on Key Public Policy Issues

BIO hosted a media briefing on Wednesday, June 30th, with Jim Greenwood and Rachel King, Co-Founder and CEO of GlycoMimetics, Inc. and member of BIO’s Executive Committee. Jim and Rachel addressed the public policies under consideration by Congress, regulatory agencies and the courts which have the potential to impact the biotechnology industry.  Key discussion topics included implementation of health care reform (biosimilars, comparative effectiveness, Therapeutic Discovery Project Program, and Cures Acceleration Network), upcoming reauthorization of Read More >

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State of the Industry Address from 2010 BIO International Convention

thumb_PerfectStorm slide

This was the opening slide for my talk in Atlanta last year. We found ourselves then in the midst of a perfect storm of economic meltdown, political volatility and scientific challenge. We knew that these challenges would bring significant change to our industry but that if we remained confident, we would emerge from these challenges better and stronger. We have. Let me tell you why I say that. Biotech stocks have outperformed virtually every other Read More >

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A Disin‘gene’uous Lawsuit: ACLU Challenges DNA Patents

From the mass production of life-saving medicines in cell cultures to the screening of our blood supply for life-threatening viruses, patented DNA molecules (often referred to as “gene patents”) are used in many ways to benefit society. The term “gene patent” is something of a misnomer because genes as they exist in the body cannot be patented. A naturally occurring gene — even a newly discovered one — cannot be patented. Patents don’t provide ownership Read More >

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