Author Archive: Karen Batra

Karen Batra

Karen Batra is Director of Food & Agriculture Communications, and has worked for BIO since 2008.   Having lived in the Washington, D.C. area for more than 20 years, Karen has worked for four major national trade associations specializing in communications and media relations, most recently at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

What Karen likes best about BIO, aside from her uber-talented colleagues, is working to promote a technology that truly helps to heal, feed and fuel the world.  In the food & ag sector, we aim to help farmers do what they do best – grow the most abundant, most affordable and safest food supply in the world.

Karen’s favorite biotech food is papaya, and her favorite genetically engineered animal is the spidey-goat.  Karen also has two Glofish, Redfish and Bluefish, who live with their non-biotech cousin, Peachy the Snail.

Latest Posts

Benefits of GE Crops Highlighted in USDA Report

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Farmer adoption of genetically engineered (GE) crops is associated with time savings, lower insecticide use, and more conservation tillage, according to a new USDA study. The report, “Genetically Engineered Crops in the United States” by Jorge Fernandez-Cornejo, Seth James Wechsler, Michael Livingston, and Lorraine Mitchell was released by USDA’s Economic Research Service on February 20. According to USDA: “Genetically engineered (GE) crops (mainly corn, cotton, and soybeans) were planted on 169 million acres in 2013, Read More >

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GM Crop Technology Provides Boost to Developing Country Farmers

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Millions of farmers around the world continue to choose to plant and replant genetically modified (GM) crop varieties because of their environmental and socio-economic benefits and the important role they play in maintaining food security, according to a new study. The report, Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/GM Crops: 2013, released annually by the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA), says a record 18 million farmers in 27 countries are growing biotech crops on Read More >

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Bee Care Team is Buzzing in North Carolina

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Too many people don’t know enough about agriculture and food production. But even fewer know about the important role that bees play in maintaining healthy farming systems. Bees are necessary for plant pollination. Yet many colonies are disappearing due to increasing disease and environmental threats, including a syndrome called Colony Collapse Disorder. “Healthy pollinators are incredibly important in creating and maintaining a healthy, nutritious and sustainable food supply,” says Dick Rogers, apiologist/entomologist with Bayer CropScience. Read More >

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Golden Rice Petition Draws 5,000+ Supporters

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If the authors of the Change.org petition condemning the destruction of Golden Rice field trials intended for the outrage to go viral, they have succeeded.  As this blog is posted, 5,239 people have signed onto the petition – most from the scientific community and added their comments urging that scientific advances not be impeded by uninformed activists. In addition, the furor in the media arena and blogosphere continues. Mark Lynas, UK-based environmentalist and former anti-GMO Read More >

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The New York Times Weighs in on Golden Rice Destruction

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Amy Harmon wrote for the New York Times about the August 8 attack and destruction of the genetically modified Golden Rice fields in the Bicol region of the Philippines: Had the plants survived long enough to flower, they would have betrayed a distinctly yellow tint in the otherwise white part of the grain. That is because the rice is endowed with a gene from corn and another from a bacterium, making it the only variety Read More >

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