Author Archive: Karen Batra

Karen Batra

Karen Batra is Director of Food & Agriculture Communications, and has worked for BIO since 2008.   Having lived in the Washington, D.C. area for more than 20 years, Karen has worked for four major national trade associations specializing in communications and media relations, most recently at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

What Karen likes best about BIO, aside from her uber-talented colleagues, is working to promote a technology that truly helps to heal, feed and fuel the world.  In the food & ag sector, we aim to help farmers do what they do best – grow the most abundant, most affordable and safest food supply in the world.

Karen’s favorite biotech food is papaya, and her favorite genetically engineered animal is the spidey-goat.  Karen also has two Glofish, Redfish and Bluefish, who live with their non-biotech cousin, Peachy the Snail.

Latest Posts

6 Myths About GMOs


As a national media spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for 9 years, Bethany Thayer says she enjoys communicating with people about healthy living and eating. Bethany Thayer MS, RDN, is director of the Henry Ford Center for Health Promotion and is president of the Michigan Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, which also named her as the Outstanding Dietitian of the Year in 2012. She writes an article in The Detroit News addressing Read More >

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Why GMOs Are a Necessity


After 20 years, the data are in:  Genetic modification boosts crop yields by 21 percent and cuts pesticides by 37 percent.  The Wall Street Journal ran an op-ed authored by Rob Fraley, executive vice president and chief technology officer of Monsanto, on how GMO’s benefit farmers and the environment: Genetically modified crops, which have generated both controversy and widespread adoption, are hitting 20-year milestones. Perhaps the anniversary slipped your mind, but 1997 was a dark Read More >

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How Animal Biotech Harnesses Nature’s Power to Fight Disease


Forbes’ GMO Answers column looks at the tremendous potential of animal biotechnology to combat human disease.  Under the theme “One Health,” these technologies – and the roadblocks that are preventing them for commercialization – are the focus on this week’s Animal Biotech Summit in Bethesda, Md. Today’s column was authored by Eddie Sullivan, Ph.D., CEO and co-founder of SAB Biotherapeutics, Inc. (SAB), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical development company in Sioux Falls, S.D.  SAB’s technology (described below) Read More >

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Could GM Mosquitoes Save Hawaii’s Endangered Birds?


Genetically modified mosquitoes could be the solution to Hawaii’s quickly disappearing avian population, including the island’s famous honeycreepers, writes Michael Specter in The New Yorker: Every four years, thousands of environmentalists gather at the World Conservation Congress to assess the state of the planet, and to consider what might be done to protect it. The 2016 congress was held in Hawaii, which is fitting, since the state is often referred to as the endangered-species capital Read More >

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High Tech Animals Stuck On the Shelf


David Warmflash writes for the Genetic Literacy Project about the challenges being faced by innovators using genetically engineered animals to solve some of the world’s most pressing health, environmental and societal problems.  Warmflash is an astrobiologist, physician and science writer: If genetically modified (GM) and genetically edited (GE) plants face an uphill battle in moving from proof-of-concept to the dinner tables of consumers, then GM and GE animals are up against a proverbial Mount Everest. Read More >

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