Author Archive: Karen Batra

Karen Batra

Karen Batra is Director of Food & Agriculture Communications, and has worked for BIO since 2008.   Having lived in the Washington, D.C. area for more than 20 years, Karen has worked for four major national trade associations specializing in communications and media relations, most recently at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

What Karen likes best about BIO, aside from her uber-talented colleagues, is working to promote a technology that truly helps to heal, feed and fuel the world.  In the food & ag sector, we aim to help farmers do what they do best – grow the most abundant, most affordable and safest food supply in the world.

Karen’s favorite biotech food is papaya, and her favorite genetically engineered animal is the spidey-goat.  Karen also has two Glofish, Redfish and Bluefish, who live with their non-biotech cousin, Peachy the Snail.

Latest Posts

Bill Gates: Embrace Genetic Modification or Starve

Bill Gates

Bill Gates has a terse response to criticism that the high-tech solutions he advocates for world hunger are too expensive or bad for the environment:  Countries can embrace modern seed technology and genetic modification or their citizens will starve. When he was in high school in the 1960s, people worried there wouldn’t be enough food to feed the world, Gates recalled in his fourth annual letter, which was published online on January 24 and reported Read More >

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BIO Applauds U.S.-Japan Action on GE Papaya

papaya-btn

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced that the Government of Japan approved Hawaii’s Rainbow papaya for commercial shipment to Japan. The Rainbow papaya is genetically engineered to be resistant to the papaya ringspot virus. This announcement marks the beginning of a new chapter for Hawaiian papaya growers. “The market opening in Japan is great news for Hawaii’s papaya producers and even better news for American agricultural exports,” said Michael Scuse, Acting Under Secretary for Read More >

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For Preventing Hunger, Biotechnology is Key

Calestous Juma

The journal Nature recently published an article authored by Calestous Juma, director of the Agricultural Innovation in Africa Project at the Harvard Kennedy School. To survive the droughts, wars and other major causes of famine, Africa must embrace technologies that enable it to produce more, better food with less effort. Juma argues, “if African countries can’t plant genetically modified crops to produce more and healthier food, vulnerable populations will be at risk.” Indeed, without the Read More >

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Future Requires Both Innovation and Collaboration

Paul Schickler DuPont

The Wilmington News Journal’s recent article, “GMOs: 10 Simple Questions (and Some Surprising Answers)” garnered a lot of attention on both sides of the debate around biotech foods.  Among the responses, a thoughtful piece authored by Pioneer Hi-Bred president Paul Schickler was published in the paper’s Sunday edition: Biotech crops are perhaps the most stringently regulated aspect of agriculture – held to the highest level of analysis and scrutiny. They are regulated by three federal Read More >

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Biotech by the Numbers: 7 Billion, 3 Billion, and 150

Karen-Batra-thumb

This week we’ve seen a lot of big numbers in the news headlines:  7 Billion, 3 Billion, and 150.  What is special about these numbers?  These three numbers actually tell a very compelling story about the importance of agricultural biotechnology. On Sunday, October 30, our world’s seventh billion person was born.  In the UK newspapers the Telegraph and the Independent, science editor Michael Hanlon explains the challenges facing “baby seven billion,” Manila’s Danica May Camacho. Read More >

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