Author Archive: Kelly Cappio

Kelly Cappio

Kelly is the Manager of Vaccines and Biodefense Policy at BIO. In her role, she advocates for policies, regulations, and legislation that improve public health through immunization and emergency preparedness. Originally from the small town of Culpeper, Virginia, Kelly enjoys traveling to new places and living in big cities. She moved to Washington, D.C. in 2009 to pursue a master’s degree in public health from the George Washington University and graduated in May 2011. In her spare time, she loves to read, play tennis, horseback ride, and most of all, spend time with her husband, Matt, and 7-lb poodle, Maeby.

Latest Posts

Vaccines Beyond 2012

polio-vaccine

Each year, approximately 1.7 million children die from a vaccine-preventable disease, and the vast majority of these deaths occur in developing countries. This BIO 2012 session, moderated by Peg Willingham of the United Nations Foundation, addressed various ways industry can help increase access to life-saving vaccines for children and adults in resource-poor countries. The thoughts of a few of the speakers on the panel for this session are summarized below. The panelists suggested that for Read More >

Health  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Implementing the WHO PIP Framework – Industry’s Role & Outlook

syringe

In May 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness (PIP) Framework after nearly five years of contentious negotiations. As noted by Anne Huvos, WHO Secretariat, the two objectives of the PIP Framework are: (1) to improve sharing of influenza viruses with human pandemic potential; and (2) to achieve more predictable, efficient, and equitable access to benefits, such as vaccines and antiviral medicines, during future pandemics. The subject of a session at Read More >

Health  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

National Infant Immunization Week, April 21-28

Immunization

Routine immunization of one birth cohort (i.e. people born in a particular year) during childhood prevents about 20 million cases of disease and 42,000 deaths in the U.S. These statistics are staggering, especially when we consider how far vaccinology and preventive medicine have come in such a short time period. Today, vaccines help protect children against 14 diseases before the age of two. Many diseases that parents once feared have been long forgotten. In the Read More >

Health  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , ,

As Vaccine Exemptions Rise, Risk of Outbreaks Intensifies

herd-immunity

Generally, we think of vaccines as protecting the vaccinated. We often forget that vaccines, when administered to enough people, protect those in the community who cannot be vaccinated due to certain health conditions, who are too young to be vaccinated, or who experience vaccine failure. This “herd immunity,” as it’s called, is analogous to the concept of ‘safety in numbers’ and is critical to outbreak prevention. However, as reported by Valerie Bauerlein and Betsy McKay Read More >

Health  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , ,

World Pneumonia Day: November 12

Pneumonia-Vax-thumb

November 12 marks World Pneumonia Day, a campaign to educate the public about this disease and to advocate for global action to treat and prevent it. Pneumonia is the leading cause of death globally for children under the age of 5, claiming the lives of more than 1.5 million children annually. Pneumonia is also largely a vaccine-preventable disease. Since the introduction of pneumococcal vaccines in the U.S. in 2000, morbidity and mortality from pneumonia have Read More >

Health  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , ,