Author Archive: Roy Zwahlen

Roy Zwahlen

Roy is Associate Counsel at BIO and the main contributor for Patently Biotech. He is a lawyer by training, with a background in international and national politics. He grew up in the developing world and believes that innovation can and does solve many of the world’s problems. Because of this, his work focuses on creating a worldwide policy environment that fosters innovation in the biotechnology sector to prevent and cure diseases such as HIV, to increase crop yields to feed more people, and to decrease the harmful effects of industry on the environment. Roy spends his free time keeping up with his three kids, a wife that knows everything (no joke), and serving in his church and broader community. Learn more about Roy from his Linkedin Profile.

Latest Posts

Patent Awards for Humanitarian Ventures

Children

The USPTO recently announced the Patents for Humanity Challenge which awards patent owners and licensees for innovations that address humanitarian needs.  Judges will chose winners from four categories: Medical technology – includes medicines, vaccines, diagnostic equipment, or assistive devices. Food and nutrition – includes agricultural technology like drought-resistant crops, more nutritious crop strains, farming equipment, and technologies that improve food storage, preservation, or preparation. Clean technology – includes technologies that improve public health by removing Read More >

Patently BIOtech  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , ,

The Real Reason Why Salk Refused to Patent the Polio Vaccine

Vaccine

Editor’s Note: Despite the progress in polio and other diseases made possible by vaccines, today we are witnessing a resurgence of vaccine-preventable illnesses as nervous parents skip their children’s shots. Watch the PBS documentary Vaccines—Calling the Shots to find learn more.  BIO is also a leading voice on the patent-ability of biotech inventions and other IP matters. To get the most recent updates on IP in the biotech world, please sign up for BIO’s free bi-monthly IP Newsletter. Read More >

Patently BIOtech  |  24 Comments  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Brazilian Innovation: A Patent Success

plant

The story of Acheflan highlights the role of patents in homegrown innovation in developing countries.  Professor Michael Ryan of George Washington University Law School reviewed several case studies (including Acheflan) in Brazil that highlight the differences in biomedical innovation both pre- and post-intellectual property reforms. In the early 1980’s, Ache Laboratorios Farmaceuticos (a Brazilian generics manufacturer) became aware of a plant that grew near coastal cities that local fishermen would mash into an oil rub Read More >

Patently BIOtech  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

NIH Licensing Efforts Target Start-Ups

NIH_Logo

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has developed a new short-term licensing arrangement they hope will encourage licensing of NIH and FDA inventions to start-up companies.  The NIH Start-Up Exclusive License Agreements targets start-up companies less than 5 years old, with less than $5M in raised capital, and fewer thans than 50 employees.  By offering an exclusive license, they hope to accelerate the technology transfer process.  However, this temporary pilot program runs only until September 30, Read More >

Patently BIOtech  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , ,

Exclusive Licenses Do Not Discourage Follow On Research

medical_research_thumb

A recent study presented at the Patent Statistics for Decision Makers Conference organized at the United States Patent Office questions the logic behind a nonexclusive license preference often found in U.S. government technology transfer policy. In “The Role of Exclusive Licensing in Follow-on Research of Academic Patented Inventions” presentation the authors demonstrate that, contrary to the belief by some, exclusive licensing does not impede future research. The authors ask two questions.  First, does exclusive licensing affect licensee follow-on research?  Read More >

Patently BIOtech  |  Leave a comment  |  Email This Post
Tags: , , , , ,