Author Archive: Roy Zwahlen

Roy Zwahlen

Roy is Associate Counsel at BIO and the main contributor for Patently Biotech. He is a lawyer by training, with a background in international and national politics. He grew up in the developing world and believes that innovation can and does solve many of the world’s problems. Because of this, his work focuses on creating a worldwide policy environment that fosters innovation in the biotechnology sector to prevent and cure diseases such as HIV, to increase crop yields to feed more people, and to decrease the harmful effects of industry on the environment. Roy spends his free time keeping up with his three kids, a wife that knows everything (no joke), and serving in his church and broader community. Learn more about Roy from his Linkedin Profile.

Latest Posts

BIO Voices Agree: Intellectual Property Delivers

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Over the last year, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Global IP Center (GIPC) has met with entrepreneurs from around the world to get their personal stories on what it takes to become a breakthrough innovator in the 21st century. While the products that these innovators create come in many shapes and sizes, all of those we’ve come into contact with—many of whom from the annual BIO International Convention—have displayed a resounding respect for and interest Read More >

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Novartis at India Supreme Court: Evergreening Myths and Patent Reality

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Novartis will go before India’s Supreme Court on September 11, 2012 challenging the refusal by the Indian Patent Office to grant a patent on its cancer drug Glivec.  The Indian Patent Office rejected Novartis’ application under a provision in Indian law which is aimed at guarding against so called “patent evergreening.” BIO has written two posts deconstructing the myth of patent evergreening. 1.  Patent “Ever-Greening”: Novartis Confronts Patent Myth in India 2.  Patent Evergreening in Read More >

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AMP v. Myriad: BIO Statement on Federal Circuit (Re)Decision

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BIO released the following statement on the Federal Circuit’s decision in the AMP v. Myriad case on remand from the Supreme Court to reconsider in light of Mayo v. Prometheus. “Today’s decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit confirms long-standing law under which valuable DNA preparations, bacterial enzymes, plant-derived antibiotics and other industrially and medically useful substances can be considered for patenting. Such patents have long provided critical incentives for expensive Read More >

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Technology Transfer Impact? Senator Bayh Informs on IPWatchdog

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IPWatchdog published an article by former Senator Birch Bayh highlighting a BIO commissioned study showing the economic impact of technology transfer on the U.S. economy.  “A new study shows that this spinning of straw into gold is precisely what our academic research organizations have been quietly doing year after year.  The just released report “The Economic Contribution of University/Nonprofit Inventions in the United States: 1996-2010” provides a much needed dose of good economic news when Read More >

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USPTO Blogpost Brings Mayo Down to Earth

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The United States Patent and Trademark Office Director David Kappos posted a blogpost called “Some Thoughts on Patentability” which discusses a recent Federal Circuit decision in CLS Bank International v. Alice Corporation and the lessons we should learn from the Federal Circuit.  “Based on my experience, I appreciate the wisdom of the court’s discussion relating to resolving disputed claims by focusing initially on patentability requirements of § 102, 103, and 112, rather than § 101. Read More >

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