It's Food AND Fuel

Biofuels & Climate Change

Last week SustainableBusiness.com posted the story, “Bill To Extend Ethanol Tax Credit Reignites Fuel vs. Food Debate.”

They write,

A bill introduced in the US House last week would extend ethanol tax credits for another five years, to 2015. This tax credit is set to expire on December 31, 2010. If extended, the tax credits will provide the conventional ethanol industry with $30 billion over five years.

They quoted Kate McMahon, Energy Policy Campaigner at Friends of the Earth who said,

The oil and ethanol industries need no further help from the American people. This money should be invested in more cutting-edge, clean, and renewable energy that won’t cause environmental degradation and increase food prices.

Food prices? Not so fast, here are a few facts.

World population growth is projected to reach 9 billion by 2050. Demand for food, energy, resources, and agricultural productivity is expected to increase at a faster rate, due to increased demand for dietary protein, primarily in developing countries. Accordingly the challenge is to sustainably produce food, feed, fiber, and biofuel within existing land constraints.

For those concerned about food you should know that:

  • Wheat and soy production have been increasing outside the U.S. since 1970 and that U.S. biofuel production since 2000 shows no impact on these trends.
  • U.S. yields of corn have consistently outpaced the world average. Furthermore, the overall harvested acreage for corn production under the renewable fuel standard is projected to remain stable due to continued yield gains.
  • In the U.S. agriculture has become more sustainable. Since 1980 productivity has increased, even while agricultural inputs have declined.
  • The increase in sustainable agriculture extends outside the boundaries of the U.S. Agricultural productivity gains in the last 20 years worldwide have been accomplished with fewer energy and water inputs per bushel, reduced soil loss, and mitigated climate impacts.

Add all that together and then add the fact that cropland in the U.S. is concentrated in the Midwest and Plains. Other areas have biomass potential in grassland and managed forests.

So that means that there is enough room for food AND fuel.

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